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  1. Spotlight Breed Of The Week  Freedom Rangers 
    Freedom Ranger Chickens

    These birds have been developed to be pasture grown, hardy birds and excellent foragers! Freedom Rangers are a broiler chick that are a great alternative to the fast-growing Cornish Rocks or the slower-growing heritage breeds. They grow at a moderate rate reaching 5-6 lbs in 9-12 weeks. This makes for a great broiler without some of the health issues that the faster-growing chicks might encounter. Their meat is tender and contains more yellow omega 3 fat and less saturated fat than the faster-growing birds. The genetic stock is derived from an American and European heritage breed that was developed in the early 1960's to meet the high standards of the French Label Rouge Free Range program. This program began 40 years ago as a grassroots movement led by visionary farmers in France. As poultry became more industrialized after World War II, demand grew in France for the taste of traditionally raised farm chickens. The  Freedom Rangers are very active and robust chickens that thrive if allowed to free range, scratch, and dust bathe in natural sunlight.

    FreedoRosterm Ranger

    Adult Birds description: Red or tri-colored feathers and yellow shanks, skin, and beaks.

    Freedom Ranger Baby Chicks
     
    Baby Chick description: Buff color to light red with some having brown specks on their heads and streaks down their backs.


    We hatch Freedom Rangers February thru May.






  2.  Spotlight Breed Of The Week Leghorns
    Brown and White Leghorn Chickens
    It’s not exactly clear the origin of the Leghorn (pronounced leg-urn) however, it appears they derived from a lightweight brown breed in Italy around the early 1800s and were known as the “Italians”. By 1850 there were two varieties the original brown version, and white. Years later in the US, they have renamed leghorns after the Tuscan port they were exported from. They immediately became popular for their prolific laying abilities, feed-to-egg ratio, and their rarity to exhibit broodiness resulting in uninterrupted egg-laying cycles that had not been seen before. Although leghorns are a leaner bird their value as egg layers earned them greater appreciation despite their small size. These beautiful birds are clever, alert and are a very active breed. They feather quickly, mature early and the pullets often begin laying at 4 months of age. Leghorns are efficient foragers and are one of the best birds for free-ranging that can avoid predators. The White Leghorn is one of the premier commercial egg-laying breeds of today and produces the majority of the world's crop of white eggs. The American Livestock Breed Conservancy have the Leghorn breed status listed as recovering and is considered a heritage sustainable breed.


    White and Brown Leghorns chickens



    Adult Birds description: Short backs, short shanks, low set bodies with graceful curves and long flowing tail feathers.  All the plumage of the White Leghorn is white. The Brown Leghorn roosters heads are orange-red, shading to golden yellow toward the shoulders, and then deep, orange-red over their backs. Their tails, wings fronts and breasts are black. Hens are more brown in color with an orangish head and neck. Leghorns have white earlobes and yellow legs.
    White Leghorn chicksBrown Leghorn Chicks

    Baby Chick description: The white variety chicks are pale yellow or creamy white. The brown variety is brown in color and have two light brown streaks down their backs. 


    Origin: Italy                                                              
    Classification Type:  Mediterranean Class
    Temperament: Flighty, noisy avoids human contact, adaptable to confinement or free range.
    Purpose: Eggs laying production
    Broodiness: Rarely
    Hardiness:  Very hardy
    Maturing: 17-20 weeks                                  Mating ratio: 12 females to 1 male
    Egg color:  White                                            Egg size:       Large to extra large
    Rate Of Lay: Excellent                                   Eggs per year: 300- 320

    Weight:     Hen    4 1/2 lbs                                  Rooster:     6 lbs       
                      Pullet  4 lbs                                        Cockerel    5 lbs
     
    Spacing:  Confined at all times 7 1/2 square feet per bird. Confined at night only at least 3 square feet of space per bird.  
    Roost height:  4Ft - 8FT  
    Life Span: Because Leghorn chickens are productive egg layers, their lifespan is less than the average bird they live to be around 4-6 years of age. However, egg production will decrease each year.
     
    Varieties:  Black, Brown, Buff, Dominique, Silver Duckwing, and White.
     
    Other facts: Most breeds that have white earlobes lay white eggs. The unique color pattern of the brown Leghorn helps to camouflage them making it harder for predators to detect them when free ranging.
                                                         









  3. STOPLIGHT BREED OF THE WEEK WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS
    White Plymouth Rock Chickens
    One of the most popular heritage breeds for a brown egg layer are the Plymouth Rocks and White Plymouth Rocks are the second most popular variety of that Plymouth Rock family. They originated in the United States around 1850 in the town of Plymouth, Massachusetts. Several individuals claim the invention of this breed by careful selection and breeding of a Spanish, White Cochin, Dominique, Buff Cochin, Black Java and a Brahma. The white color is the result of recessive white genes. This is a different inheritance than the dominant white color inheritance found in white breeds such as White Leghorns. The White Plymouth Rocks were accepted into the American standard of perfection in 1888. The Plymouth Rock breed became popular very rapidly, and in fact, until World War II, no breed was ever kept and bred as extensively as these birds. Its popularity came from its early laying abilities and being an outstanding dual-purpose farm chicken. They are extremely hardy docile birds that can handle cold weather as well as excellent producers of large brown eggs, and meat that was considered tasty and juicy. They seldom go broody and do well in confinement or are content to free range. The Plymouth Rock hens approximate mature weight is 7 ½ pounds and Roosters 9 ½ pounds. The Plymouth Rock was one of the foundation breeds for the broiler industry in the 1920's. The American Livestock Breed Conservancy have the Plymouth Rock breed status listed as recovering and is Considered a Heritage Sustainable Breed.
    Adult Birds description:  Long, broad bodies with well-rounded moderately deep breasts. All of the feathers of White Plymouth Rocks are white, which produces a uniformly white bird.  Their combs are red medium size, single comb evenly serrated with 5 well-defined points that is straight and upright. Their beak feet and legs are yellow.
    White Plymouth Rock Baby Chicks
     
    Baby Chick description: The chicks are mostly white with some having a smoky gray tint. They have single or serrated combs. The beaks, feet, and legs are yellow.

    Origin:  United States                                                             
    Classification Type:  American Class
    Temperament: Adaptable to confinement or free range, calm & docile.
    Purpose: Dual purpose eggs laying and meat production.
    Broodiness: Not generally but make good mothers.
    Hardiness:  Cold hardy
    Maturing:  18-20 weeks                                 Mating ratio: 10 females to 1 male
    Egg color:  Brown                                         Egg size:   Large
    Rate Of Lay: Excellent                                  Eggs per year: 280- 300

    Weight: Hen    7 1/2  lbs     Rooster:    9 1/2 lbs       
                  Pullet  6 lbs            Cockerel    8 lbs

    Spacing:  Confined at all times 10 square feet per bird. Confined at night only at least 4 square feet of space per bird.  

    Roost height:  2Ft -4FT  

    Life Span: Of the White Plymouth Rocks depends on how well they are cared for, and the quality of life that they enjoy. A standard White Plymouth Rock will generally live for approximately 6-8 years but have been known to reach 10-12 years. However, laying abilities will decrease each year.
     
    Varieties:   Barred--- Buff-- Silver-- Penciled--White--Partridge- Columbian--Blue
     
    Other facts: The most popular Plymouth Rock variety is the Barred Plymouth Rock. Growers who like a leaner meat prefer raising White Plymouth Rocks for their broiler meat. 






  4.                    STOPLIGHT BREED OF THE WEEK PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCKS
    Partridge Plymouth Rocks or "Partridge Rocks", as they're called, are a rare and beautiful unique dual-purpose bird. They originated in the US in the late 1800s and their heritage is a little sketchy. However, it is believed that the breeds used to produce the Partridge Rocks were Partridge Cochins, Dark Cornish, Brown Leghorns, Golden Laced Wyandottes, Barred Rocks and a single comb Golden Laced Wyandotte male which were mated in various combinations to produce this new variety. Their striking color patterns make one of the best varieties for the exhibitor. The Partridge Rock roosters have rich redheads and mostly red upper backs, while their body, breast, and main tail feathers are black. Their hackle and saddle feathers are greenish- black laced with red, and their wings are black and red. Hens are a deep, reddish bay color with black edging on their back, breast, and body plumage.  In the 19th century, all the varieties of the Plymouth Rock breeds were by far the most popular breed of chickens during that time. Although their numbers have dwindled over the years, the Plymouth Rocks are still very popular among small-flock owners for their early maturity, their cold-hardiness, and their robustness. They do well either confined or free-range and do not slow down laying eggs quite as much as other dual-purpose breeds during the winter months. Not only are they dependable brown egg layers but also are calm, docile birds and are very good setters. Despite their popularity, their conservation status is listed as "Recovering" by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

    Adult Birds description: Their backs are long and broad throughout the entire length with a slight concave sweep to the tail. The body is long, with the breast being broad, well-rounded and moderately deep. Partridge Rock males have rich redheads and mostly red upper backs, while their body, breast, and main tail feathers are black. Their hackle and saddle feathers are greenish- black laced with red, and their wings are black and red. Hens are a deep, reddish bay color with black edging on their back, breast, and body plumage. The comb is an even serrated, single comb, having five well-defined points, and it is straight and upright. Their feet and legs are yellow.

     

    Baby Chick description:  The chicks are a rich dark brown resembling the color of an expensive fur coat.
     
     

    Origin: United States 
    Classification Type: American  
    Temperament: Adaptable to confinement or free range, calm & docile.
    Purpose: Dual purpose eggs laying and meat production.
    Broodiness: Not generally but make good mothers.
    Hardiness:  Cold hardy & can tolerate heat well.
    Maturing:  18-22 weeks                                 Mating ratio: 9 females to 1 male
    Egg color:  Brown                                          Egg size:   Large
    Rate Of Lay: Great                                        Eggs per year: 280- 300

    Weight: Hen   7 lbs     Rooster:     8.5 lbs       
                 Pullet  5 lbs     Cockerel    7.5 lbs

    Spacing:  Confined at all times 10 square feet per bird. Confined at night only at least 4 square feet of space per bird  

    Roost height:  2Ft -4FT  

    Life Span: Of the Partridge Plymouth Rock depends on how well they are cared for, and the quality of life that they enjoy. A standard Partridge Plymouth Rock will generally live for approximately 6-8 years but have been known to reach 10-12 years. However, egg production will decrease every year.
     
    Varieties:   Barred, White, Buff, Silver Penciled, Partridge, Columbian, Blue, Black. 
     
    Other facts: Partridge Plymouth Rocks are not quite as large as their cousins the Barred and White Plymouth Rocks. Very few hatcheries have chicks available of this unique rare variety of Plymouth Rocks.








  5.  STOPLIGHT BREED OF THE WEEK NEW HAMPSHIRE REDS


    Many people assume that the New Hampshire Red Chicken is an old-time breed. The truth of the matter is the New Hampshire Red is actually a relatively newer heritage breed. This breed was just recently in the news for being selected as the state poultry bird for the state it is named after, New Hampshire. This successful dual-purpose bird was developed around 1915 in New England using Rhode Island Reds as the breeding foundation stock. There is no record of any other outside bloodlines being introduced into the breeding program. Many generations of an intense selection from the Rhode Island red breeding stock for early growth and maturity, quick feathering, vigor, plump carcasses and production of large Brown eggs thus produced the New Hampshire Red breed. With time, the New Hampshire Red was recognized for its specialized traits, and it was admitted to the Standard of Perfection in 1935. The New Hampshire’s as they were commonly called were a significant contributor to the egg production industry. The breed’s rapid growth and early maturity were also recognized by the large broiler industry at the time. However, the New Hampshire differs from the Rhode Island Red in several respects. The color of the plumage was noticeable, being a lighter shade of red. This lighter shade was similar to some strains of the Rhode Island Reds in which poultry raisers had concentrated on egg-laying ability without regard to color. The body of the New Hampshire has been described as more triangular than that of the Rhode Island Red. The New Hampshire chicks also feather out rapidly, grows quickly, and matures early. They do tend to go broody and make good mothers. The New Hampshire is a reliable and robust cold hardy breed that adapt well to confinement or free ranging. This fine dual-purpose strain produces large brown eggs with an extra good shell texture. Medium-heavy in weight, with a yellow-skinned carcass free from dark pinfeathers which dress out a nice, plump carcass for either use as a broiler or a roaster.

    The New Hampshire is not considered a rare breed however, the American Livestock Breed Conservancy has placed this breed on their watch list.
    Adult Birds description: Compared to a Rhode Island red the body of the New Hampshire is much shorter and more compact. The coloring is primarily a chestnut red with black tail feathers. Males appear to be somewhat darker in color than the females. The combs are single with five well-defined points and are moderate in size. The comb of the male is straight and upright. The comb of a female may be lopped. The legs and feet are rich yellow tinged with reddish horn.

     
    Baby Chick description: Light buff red color with even lighter color chest and wingtips. They are much lighter than Rhode Island red and Production Red but darker than a Buff Orpington. They had single, serrated combs and yellow legs and feet. 

    Origin: United States  
    Classification Type: American 
    Temperament: Adaptable to confinement or free range, calm & docile.
    Purpose: Dual purpose eggs laying and meat production
    Broodiness: Typically make good mothers
    Hardiness:  Cold hardy
    Maturing:  20-22 weeks                                  Mating ratio: 10 females to 1 male
    Egg color:  Brown                                          Egg size:   Large
    Rate Of Lay: Great                                         Eggs per year: 280- 300

    Weight: Hen    7   lbs           Rooster:    9 1/2 lbs       
                  Pullet  5 1/2 lbs       Cockerel   7 1/2 lbs

    Spacing:  Confined at all times 10 square feet per bird. Confined at night only at least 4 square feet of space per bird  

    Roost height:  2Ft -4FT  

    Life Span: Of the New Hampshire Red will depend on how well they are cared for, and the quality of life that they enjoy. A standard New Hampshire Red chicken will generally live for approximately 6-8 years but have been known to reach 10-12 years. However, egg production will decrease each year.
     


     
    Other interesting facts: New Hampshire Reds and Rhode Island Reds were used as the foundation stock in producing the Production Red Breed.  

    We hatch New Hampshire Reds February thru May.







  6.                                                                 
                                   Spotlight Breed Of The Week Light Brahmas

    There has been considerable controversy over the origin of the Brahma Breed. It is believed that the Brahma Breed was developed around 1840 in the United States from large birds imported from the Chinese port of Shanghai and were known as the "Shanghai" birds. It also seems clear that Chittagong fowls were used to a very small degree which stamped head and comb characteristics onto this breed differentiating it from the Shanghai breed (now known as the Cochin). Back in those days, there were no written standards, no poultry associations, and no registries. Since what became known as the Brahma chicken was being presented under at least twelve names, there was much confusion. In 1852 a group of poultry fanciers met in Boston to declare the official name to be Brahmapootras after a river in India, which was later shorted to Brahmas. The credit for shortening the name to Brahmas goes to the publisher of The Northern Farmer, who in 1853 did so for very practical reasons, simply he needed to save space on the printing page! This unique breed, together with the Cochin, fueled what became known as “Hen Fever” – a national obsession for poultry that hit both America and England around 1850. For the following 80 years, the Brahma breed became the main source of chicken meat in this country. After 1930, other breeds were deemed more economical for massive meat production farms, and the Brahma breed declined. Now the Brahma breed is considered rare and often referred to as the “King of All Poultry”. The Light Brahma chicken is appreciated for its size, strength, and vigor. They are attractive birds with their smooth fitting full plumage, stately massive bodies and heavily fully feathered shanks and outer toes. The Brahma is an ideal bird for colder climates and is considered a superior winter-layer for their size.  Brahmas make excellent mothers, are very calm, docile and are a good dual-purpose bird.  The roosters can weigh up to 12 pounds and the hens close to 10. They adapt well to confinement or free range.  The Light Brahma breed is truly a unique and interesting bird that will produce lots of large brown eggs and would be a great addition to any flock.

    Adult Description:  Light Brahmas are mainly white in color with, black-edged feathers in the neck, wings, and tail. They have heavily feathered shanks and outer toes, a pea comb and a ‘beetle brow’ where the forehead slightly overhangs the eyes.

     

    Baby Chick description:  Creamy white color with feathers on legs and toes. They have pea combs and legs and toes are yellow. 

    Origin:
    Classification Type: Asiatic Class
    Temperament: Friendly, pet-like demeanor adaptable to confinement or free range
    Purpose: Dual purpose eggs laying and meat production
    Broodiness: Exceptionally  make good mothers
    Hardiness:  Cold hardy
    Maturing:  20-22 weeks                               Mating ratio: 8 females to 1 male
    Egg color:  Brown                                        Egg size:   Large
    Rate Of Lay: good                                       Eggs per year: 250-275

    Weight: Hen   9.5 lbs     Rooster:   12+ lbs       
                  Pullet  8 lbs       Cockerel   10 lbs

    Spacing:  Confined at all times at least 10 square feet per bird. Confined at night only at least 4 square feet of space per bird.
      
    Roost height:  2Ft -4FT
      

    Life Span: Of the Light Brahmas, depends on how well they are cared for, and the quality of life that they enjoy. A standard Light Brahma will generally live for approximately 6-8 years but have been known to reach 10-12 years. However, egg production will decrease every year.
     
    Varieties:   Black, Buff, Dark, and White. More often the white variety is referred to as a Light Brahma chicken.
     
     
    Other facts:  Brahmas were first exported from the US to England in December 1852, when George Burnham sent nine "Gray Shanghaes" now known as Light Brahmas to Queen Victoria of England – making sure the gift was much publicized. Prices jumped from $12-15 per pair to $100-150. Burnham’s stock proved of quality and formed the basis for the Dark Brahma variety – which was developed in England and later shipped back to America. 

    We hatch Light Brahmas February thru May. 





  7.       Welsummers The Spotlight Breed Of The Week

    Welsummers are a rare breed chicken with Dutch origins, named after the village of Welsum, Holland and were developed sometime early in the 1900's. This practical and beautiful breed was quickly imported to England and other parts of Europe and finally made its way into the US in 1928. However, the American Poultry Association did not include the  Welsummer breed in its Standard of Perfection until 1991. This Breed was particularly sought after for their ability to lay large brown eggs. Their eggs range in a variety of reddish brown colors from terracotta to mahogany, with varying amounts of brown speckles. However, the pigment of the eggs is far from ordinary the deep brown colors can actually rub off on your hands. This is because the pigment color is only added at the end of the egg-laying sequence. They Occasionally go broody and tend not to be good mothers. They are intelligent docile fast-growing birds with friendly personalities, which love to free range and forage for food but can also be kept contained quite happily. The famous colorful Kellogg’s Rooster was a  Welsummer.



    Adult Birds description: The Welsummer is a large, upright, with a broad back and full breast, The Males and females have very different Plumage coloring. Males have an intricate and beautiful coloring which includes a dark red across the saddle and bright green in the wings, as well as beautiful, black large tail feathers. Each feather of the back of the females is reddish brown, stippled with black and has a distinct lighter shaft. They have a single bright red comb, wattle, and earlobes.
    Welsummer Baby Chicks

    Baby Chick description: The chicks are a reddish brown with chipmunk like striping on the top of their heads and down their backs

    Origin:  Holland
    Classification Type: Continental
    Temperament: Adaptable to confinement or free range, calm & docile.
    Purpose: Dual purpose eggs laying and meat production
    Broodiness: Occasionally generally do not make good mothers
    Hardiness:   Very hardy can tolerate almost any climate.
    Maturing: 20-22 weeks                                  Mating ratio: 9 females to 1 male
    Egg color:  Dark Brown with Speckles          Egg size:   Large
    Rate Of Lay:  Good                                        Eggs per year:  180-220

    Weight: Hen   6   lbs     Rooster:    7  lbs       
                  Pullet 5  lbs      Cockerel   6  lbs
     
    Spacing:  Confined at all times 10 square feet per bird. Confined at night only at least 4 square feet of space per bird.
     
    Roost height:  2Ft -4FT

    Life Span: Of the  depends on how well they are cared for, and the quality of life that they enjoy. Generally, they will live for approximately 6-8 years but have been known to reach 10-12 years. However, egg production will decrease every year.
     .

    Other facts: The Famous rooster named Cornelius you find on the Kellogg’s Cornflake cereal box is a Welsummer.

    We Hatch  Welsummers twice a week February thru May.  






  8.   Cuckoo Marans The Spotlight Breed Of The Week

    This breed was developed in France in the mid-1800's in the town of Maran. In the early 1900’s They made their way to the UK and have gradually made themselves popular in various countries around the world. However, Cuckoo Marans are still very rare in the United States. These are a fast-growing nice dual-purpose bird for both eggs and meat. They resemble a  Barred Plymouth Rock except the black and white barring is not as perfect on the  Cuckoo Marans which results in a subtle difference in their feathering patterns. The Marans are best known for their ability to lay deep chocolate brown eggs. The brown egg color can vary in darkness as the hens go through their laying cycles. Calcium and Vitamin K have been known to help aid some in maintaining the chocolate brown egg shell color. Marans adapt well to confinement and are also great foragers for free ranging. They are a calm docile bird that can adapt to almost any climate and have been known to be disease-resistant. 
                                                                             
    Adult Birds description:  Cuckoo Marans resembles the Barred Rock in color by displaying feathers which are all crossed throughout with irregular dark and light slate colored bars. Hens have twice as much dark slate color per line making them much darker. They have Long, broad bodies with well-rounded moderately deep breasts. Their combs are single red medium size, with a rough texture and sharp edges. Beaks, feet, and legs are white.
                                                                           
    Baby Chick description: The chicks are black with a yellow spot on the top of their heads with yellow wing tips and abdomens. Males chicks tend to be a lighter shade of black almost silver with a larger yellow spot on their heads than the females. The beaks, feet, and legs are mostly white with some black coloring and have single or serrated combs.


    Origin:  France
    Classification Type: Continental
    Temperament: Adaptable to confinement or free range, calm & docile.
    Purpose: Dual purpose eggs laying and meat production
    Broodiness: Occasionally but make good mothers
    Hardiness:   Very hardy can tolerate almost any climate.
    Maturing: 20-22 weeks                                  Mating ratio: 8 females to 1 male
    Egg color:  Dark Brown                                 Egg size:  Large
    Rate Of Lay:  Good                                       Eggs per year:  180-220

    Weight: Hen   6 ½  lbs     Rooster:    9  lbs       
                  Pullet  5 ½ lbs     Cockerel    7 lbs
     
    Spacing:  Confined at all times 10 square feet per bird. Confined at night only at least 4 square feet of space per bird 
    Roost height:  2Ft -4FT
    Life Span: Of the Cuckoo Marans depends on how well they are cared for, and the quality of life that they enjoy. Cuckoo Marans will generally live for approximately 6-8 years but have been known to reach 10-12 years. However, egg production will decrease every year.
     
    Varieties:  Black Tailed Buff, Cuckoo, Golden Cuckoo, Columbian, Black Copper, Wheaten, Birchen, Black, White.

    Other facts:  Not only are the Marans' eggs very dark, they also tend to be more spherical in shape than other breeds.

    We Hatch Cuckoo Marans twice a week February thru May.  




  9. Mt Healthy Hatcheries Buckeye Chicken The Buckeye is truly the feminist's chicken!


    March is Women’s History Month and with the social climate of today empowering women and finally giving them recognition, it only seems fitting to honor Mrs. Nettie Metcalf. She is the only American woman to have developed an officially recognized breed of chickens.

    In the late 1800's Nettie Metcalf, a housewife from Warren Ohio created a red chicken breed and appropriately named it Buckeyes after the state of Ohio. Buckeyes are unique in the American Class of chickens in that it is the only breed created entirely by a woman and officially accepted into the American Poultry Association in 1904. The industry was dominated by very influential businessmen heavily invested in the new Rhode Island Red breed and they did everything in their power to oust the Buckeye breed. Their attempts to do so failed. However, somehow the breed disappeared from the records of the American Poultry Association standards around 1915. It’s unclear how or even why that happened but the breed reappears around the mid to late 1930’s again as a recognized breed. However, like many other things, the great depression had an impact on the Buckeye breed and it nearly faded into obscurity. This breed is still considered quite rare but in the last couple of years, they have been upgraded from the threatened list to the watch list by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.

    The Buckeye is the only purely American breed to sport a pea comb, and this, combined with its stocky build, makes it a supremely cold-hardy bird. Buckeyes have rich yellow skin, with mahogany feathering and black tails. They adjust to confinement well but prefer to range on grass. They are extremely friendly docile birds. A good dual-purpose producer of brown eggs well suited for small farmyards and backyard flocks. 


                                  



  10. Mt Healthy Hatcheries 10 Most Popular Breeds Year After Year


    Our 2018 hatching season has started! As many of our customers start planning their new flocks the most frequently asked question is what are our top selling breeds?

    1.
    Cornish Rock cross

    Cornish  Rock Cross 
     
    The large massive Cornish Cockerels are bred to large broiler type White Rock hens. The cross produces one of the finest quality broiler type chicks that can be found anywhere. They make market weight in 7 weeks. Many of our customers report 4 lb. broilers in 7 to 8 weeks. 

     2.
    Golden Comet Chickens

    Golden Comet Chickens 

    The  Golden Comet pullet is easily one of the finest brown egg layers available today. They mature early and lay eggs of excellent size and quality. She is an extremely quiet bird, that seems to be able to withstand the colder, non-insulated, laying houses of the small flock owner, better than most breeds.  
    3.
    Araucanas/Ameraucanas Chickens
    Araucanas/Ameraucanas


    Originally from Chile, in South America, they are called the Easter egg fowl. They lay colored eggs: blue, green, pink, and olive drab. These birds vary in size and color, some may have whiskers and others muffs of feathers that cover their ears. Their eggs are reported to have more nutritional value than ordinary eggs

    4.
    Buff Orpington Chickens

    Buff Orpington Chickens
    An old time favorite with poultry people for many years. These are a nice quiet breed. They are a beautiful buff color and will lay lots of nice brown eggs.  
                

     5.
    Barred Plymouth Rocks
     

     Barred Plymouth Rock Chickens

    This is another old favorite and one that, in true breeding style, delivers big profits. This is one of the oldest and most selected strain of Barred Rocks in the U.S. The Barred Plymouth Rock has held its own because of its great merit as a profitable, practical fowl for every day in the year use.

     6.
    Rhode Island Red Chickens

    Rhode Island Red Chickens 

    If you are striving for the "Peak" in egg production and still want a heavy bird with good market possibilities, these Reds are for you. A check of national egg laying contest records will reveal the superior egg laying qualities of this breed.         

    7.
     Silver laced Wyandotte Chickens

    Silver Laced Wyandottes Chickens



    These are truly magnificently colored birds. Their silvery white feathers, laced with black make them a most attractive bird in your barnyard. They are heavy producers of large brown eggs.

     8.
    Golden Laced Wyandotte Chickens

      

    Golden Laced Wyandottes Chickens              



    Is one of the most beautiful breeds we offer. Their feather pattern is a combination of rich golden brown laced with a greenish-black tipped feather. They have rose combs, and are good producers of brown eggs

     9.
    Black Australorps Chickens

    Black Australorps


    Is an eye-catching bird. It is black with an intense beetle-green sheen on its feathers. Australorps are very good brown egg layers, in fact, one hen still holds the world's record by laying 364 eggs in 365 days under official Australian testing.

     10.
     Black Sex Link Chickens

    Black Sex Link Chickens


    This valuable chicken is produced by mating an R.I. Red male to a Barred Rock female. The pullets are black with a reddish cast and are splendid layers of large brown eggs. Roosters resemble a Barred rock.




    Due to the popularity of these 10 breeds, we hatch them year-round. Right now, we are hatching every Wednesday and will be in full swing by February 21st hatching twice a week all 28 breeds of chicks that we offer. Hopefully, this information will help guide you in selecting what breeds to add to your new flocks. For the best selection get your orders in the early before they are gone! Also, you can request a free catalog or download our catalog from our website at www.mthealthy.com.